Abbott and Santamaria. Does Abbot want an extreme Catholic Theocracy to replace democracy?

At the beginning of this year I blogged about the connections between the Catholic Church, B A Santamaria, Archbishop Pell, John Howard, Tony Abbott and Rupert Murdoch. Since gaining office Abbott has implemented the nut-case policies advocated by B A Santermaria in the 1960’s. I decided it was time to rerun those blogs to a now much wider audience and question again where Abbott’s loyalties lie. Does he want to implement B A Santamaria’s dream of replacing democracy with an extreme radical Catholic theocracy?

As a disclaimer to start all religions have weirdos and this blog is in no way anti Catholic, only anti Santamaria’s brand of Catholicism.

Questions have been asked about Tony Abbott’s connection to the Catholic Church and whether his loyalties lie with the church or the Australian Parliament. This is a legitimate question. There is supposed to be separation between religion (all religion) and governance.

In an article by Phillip Coorey (Canberra Times, December 5 2011) Sydney Morning Herald chief political correspondent, Malcolm Turnbull is reported have said during the launch of a book by Hal Colebatch titled The Modest Member: The Life & Times of Bert Kelly:

”We should not delude ourselves with political humbug into imagining the opponents of freedom – economic, social, political – are only to be found on what we like to call the left,” he said. ”Nor should we imagine that there are no advocates of big government to be found on what is called the right.”

Coory also wrote that ‘Mr Turnbull did not name names but invoked Mr Santamaria, a central influence on Mr Abbott during his formative political years and somebody whom he still mentions.’

Tony Abbot was a pupil of B.A.Santamaria for 22 years, and once described Santamaria as ‘The greatest living Australian.”

Santamaria was a extreme Catholic radical who said that all private and public policy must be according to strict Catholic doctrine. Basically Santamaria wanted Australia to be governed as a Catholic theocracy.

In an interview on Radio National (March14, 2001) Fr Bruce Duncan  said of Santamaria.

“I don’t think he went out of his way to mislead and misinterpret events, I think he was just so convinced of his ideas that he automatically kept reinterpreting things to mean the exact opposite of what they had originally intended to mean.”

The same might be said of Santamaria’s pupil, Tony Abbott.

Looking back at B.A.Santamaria is a way of understanding Tony Abbott and why Santamaria’s ghost is alive and well and resided in Parliament House, Canberra.

Following discussion about Tony Abbot and B A Santamaria I wondered if Murdoch was in there somewhere. The thing that put me off was that Murdoch is not a Catholic. But;

Rupert Murdoch was given a Catholic ‘Knight Commander of St Gregory’ for his services to the Catholic Church 1998 by John Paul II. This was in spite of Murdoch not being a Catholic. Still, we have seen how Murdoch is not adverse to jumping from ship to ship as it suits his purpose, as shown by dumping Australia for the USA to get around minor legalities.

In Australia Santamaria’s Catholic connections included Mannix and Pell. Political disciples included Howard and Abbott. I am not even going to try to put this all together. All I can say is that the Catholic Church, B A Santamaria, Mannix, Pell, Howard, Rupert Murdoch and Tony Abbott are twisted together in a way that would be impossible to untangle.

Santamaria had no formal political role and never ran for office, but he kept Labor out of power for 17 years. He was also huge in the life of Abbott, who said after his death that Santamaria “saw politics as a way of giving glory to God”. Historical amnesia about Santamaria also raises the question about how well we know Tony Abbott, the man who would be Prime Minister.

Financial Review. Tony Abbott’s higher calling 27 Apr 2012 01:03:00 | UPDATED: 27 Apr 2012 09:00:42 Accessed 21 January http://www.afr.com/p/lifestyle/afrmagazine/tony_abbott_higher_calling_aNGk1uJKD26R4KQ6TWkbJJ

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Do we need to expand the meaning of Taliban?

Many words in the English language start off as specific and then move into the general. Taliban in its present form refers to a specific group who want to impose a Islamic theocracy as the form of government in Afghanistan. It would not be fair to equate all followers of Islam to being ‘Taliban.’

Could the word Taliban be expanded to mean the desire to impose a religious theocracy as a form of government? Could we call the Jewish radicals who want to impose a Jewish theocracy on Israel the ‘Jewish Taliban.’

Tony Abbott is a disciple of B A Santamaria whose stated policy was that all private and pubic policy should according to strict Catholic doctrine.

As Santamaria said in 1948: ‘the most important objective of Christians … [is that they] should be capable of formulating or willing to follow a distinctively Christian policy on every social and public issue.’ ……

So what does this have to do with Abbott? I think it would be worrying if this kind of integralist Catholicism infected contemporary public life. It has no place in a pluralist, democratic state. It is also the manifestation of the kind of Catholicism that was abandoned by serious, mainstream Catholics five decades ago.

Collins, P., 2010. Abbott and Santamarias Undemocratic Catholicism  Eureka Street 20/16 August 27, 2010

Would it be legitimate to suggest that Abbott was the leader of the Catholic Taliban in Australia? Yes. I think at the very least we need to ask Tony Abbott to explain the relationship between his radical Catholicism and his political beliefs.

Paul Collins is by no means the only political (and Economic) commentator questioning Abbott’s form of Catholicism.

So do we need a word like ‘Taliban’ to describe any group who want to impose a religious theocracy as a form of government? No-matter what our view of religion it would be unfair to equate all Catholics to Tony Abbott, or all followers of Islam with the Afghani Taliban.

I think we need a word to separate followers of religion from the radicals who see it as a form of government. The word ‘Taliban’ would seem to fit the need.

How do Catholics see it? This is from Catholica http://www.catholica.com.au/forum/index.php?id=112275

Does BA Santamaria exert more power today than ever before in Aus society? (Main Forum)

One thing I think is pretty evident now in this country is the way the old protestant establishment has almost totally disintegrated without a fight even*. The way these former DLP tragics have moved right across and taken over the Liberal Party of Menzies is a quite incredible phenomenon that there has been little commentary about in the media. Between George Pell’s strangulation hold over the Catholic Church across Australia** and the rise to power of the Santamaria Catholics in the Liberal Party, whatever the morality of it, or the practical outcomes that it may end up producing, you do have to stand in absolute awe of how unlikely an outcome it would have seemed half a century ago.

Brian Coyne LINDEN, NSW, Monday, September 10, 2012, 15:44

It seems Catholics also recognize the Catholic Taliban

Tony Abbott, Santamaria’s Ghost.

Questions are being asked about Tony Abbott’s connection to the Catholic Church and whether his loyalties lie with the church or the Australian Parliament. This is a legitimate question. There is supposed to be separation between religion (all religion) and governance.

This post is a copy of one of my first blogs that virtually nobody read because I didn’t have any followers on Twitter. Now I have a few it is worth a re-blog.

In an article by Phillip Coorey (Canberra Times, December 5) Sydney Morning Herald chief political correspondent, Malcolm Turnbull is reported have said during the launch of a book by Hal Colebatch titledThe Modest Member: The Life & Times of Bert Kelly:

”We should not delude ourselves with political humbug into imagining the opponents of freedom – economic, social, political – are only to be found on what we like to call the left,” he said. ”Nor should we imagine that there are no advocates of big government to be found on what is called the right.”

Coory also wrote that ‘Mr Turnbull did not name names but invoked Mr Santamaria, a central influence on Mr Abbott during his formative political years and somebody whom he still mentions.’

Tony Abbot was a pupil of B.A.Santamaria for 22 years, and once described Santamaria as ‘The greatest living Australian.”

Santamaria was a extreme Catholic radical who said that all private and public policy must be according to strict Catholic doctrine. Basically Santamaria wanted Australia to be governed as a Catholic theocracy.

In an interview on Radio National (March14, 2001) Fr Bruce Duncan  said of Santamaria.

“I don’t think he went out of his way to mislead and misinterpret events, I think he was just so convinced of his ideas that he automatically kept reinterpreting things to mean the exact opposite of what they had originally intended to mean.”

The same might be said of Santamaria’s pupil, Tony Abbott.

Looking back at B.A.Santamaria is a way of understanding Tony Abbott and why I think that a vote for Tony Abbott is a vote for Santamaria’s ghost.